Green roof at University of Michigans Childrens and Womens Hospital Photo courtesy of UM Health System
<p> The University of Michigan&#39;s new C.S. Mott Children&#39;s Hospital and Von Voigtlander Women&#39;s Hospital, Ann Arbor, Mich., has a green roof.</p>

Construction Zone: Green Health (with Related Video)

The University of Michigan's new C.S. Mott Children's Hospital and Von Voigtlander Women's Hospital have received LEED silver certification for high-performance, energy-efficient, green construction, design and operation.

The facility was built using strategies aimed at improving performance, including energy savings; water efficiency; CO2 emissions reduction; improved indoor environmental quality; and stewardship of resources and sensitivity to their impacts.

The new green roof on the hospitals filters rainfall as part of a natural stormwater-management system. Planted with sedum, a drought-resistant perennial groundcover, the living roof helps insulate the building and reduce energy loss, contributes to overall air quality and reduces the urban heat-island effect. The eco-friendly roof also is expected to last twice as long as a conventional roof.

Most of the flooring in the new building is rubber-based, which does not require waxing, stripping or finishing. The floors are PVC and chlorine-free, contributing to the overall indoor air quality.

Other green features:

  • 84.6 percent of wood materials are certified in accordance with FSC (Forest Stewardship Council) principles.
  • Construction equipment operated on biodiesel fuel.
  • Interior materials such as carpet, paint, adhesives and composite woods, were chosen for low-emittance characteristics.
  • HEPA filters enhance air quality for immuno-compromised and other high-risk patients.

The facility, which opened last December, was completed by UM Architecture, Engineering and Construction.

Related Video

Watch a related video about the history of the hospitals.

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