Supreme Court says school interrogation violated Miranda rules

June 17, 2011
Authorities must take suspect's age into account when spelling out Miranda protections

Police violated the rights of a North Carolina middle school student when they pulled him from class and interrogated him without informing him he didn't have to answer questions. The U.S. Supreme Court ruled 5 to 4 that authorities need to take age into account when deciding whether they need to inform suspects of their rights not to incriminate themselves. The Raleigh News & Observer says the case dates to 2005 when a 13-year-old boy was pulled out of class at a Chapel Hill middle school and interrogated by a police detective and three other adults about some neighborhood break-ins. The boy confessed. He was never told he had the right to an attorney or any rights specified in the so-called Miranda warning.

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